Preventing Youth Violence

Youth violence and crime affect a community's economic health, as well as individuals' physical and mental health and well-being. Homicide is the third leading cause of death for youth in our country. In 2012, more than 630,000 young people ages 10-24 were treated in emergency departments for injuries sustained from violence. 1

Each neighborhood and community has unique experiences with violence and different resources available to them. There is no one-size-fits-all approach to preventing youth violence. However, communities can help reduce youth violence by developing a city-wide strategy that combines prevention, intervention, treatment, and re-entry strategies. The National Forum on Youth Violence Prevention is working with communities to design these strategies. Learn more »

Updated: Wednesday, April 09, 2014
Feature Articles
Bryan Stevenson Bryan Stevenson Delivers Five Key Messages During 2013 Summit Closing Remarks

"That's going to make you tired, tired, tired," Ms. Rosa Parks once said to Bryan Stevenson, Founder and Executive Director of the Equal Justice Initiative (EJI). Along with Ms. Parks' words, Johnnie Carr's rejoinder in that conversation, "That's why you've got to be brave, brave, brave," is a message to all National Forum on Youth Violence Prevention cities to continue an exhausting, challenging, and worthy struggle.

Attorney General Eric Holder September 2013 Summit on Preventing Youth Violence

On September 26 and 27, representatives from the Administration, Congress, local authorities, community advocacy groups, grantees, and youth from 10 cities participated in the 2013 Summit on Preventing Youth Violence in Arlington, Virginia.

National Forum on Youth Violence Prevention Working Session 2012 National Forum on Youth Violence Prevention Working Session 2012

On December 10 and 11, representatives from the ten cities in the National Forum on Youth Violence Prevention (Forum) met together in Washington, DC. This was the first time representatives from all ten cities in the Forum – Boston, Camden, Chicago, Detroit, Memphis, Minneapolis, New Orleans, Philadelphia, Salinas, and San Jose – had an opportunity to share their work and exchange ideas.

Attorney General Eric Holder Expands National Forum on Youth Violence Prevention Attorney General Eric Holder Expands National Forum on Youth Violence Prevention to Ten Cities

Attorney General Eric Holder and Acting Assistant Attorney General for the Office of Justice Programs (OJP) Mary Lou Leary today announced that four new cities would join a White House initiative to prevent youth violence. New Orleans, Philadelphia, Minneapolis and Camden, N.J., will join the six original cities in the National Forum on Youth Violence Prevention (Forum) to reduce youth violence and gang activity and improve public safety.

Highlights from the 2012 Summit on Preventing Youth Violence Highlights from the 2012 Summit on Preventing Youth Violence

Representatives from Boston, Chicago, Detroit, Memphis, Salinas, and San Jose gathered in Washington, DC on April 2 and 3, 2012 for the second Summit on Preventing Youth Violence.

Doctor talking with patient Health Centers as Partners in Youth Violence Prevention

For more than 45 years, Health Resources and Services Administration supported health centers have delivered comprehensive, high-quality primary health care to patients regardless of their ability to pay.

Congressman Robert Scott, Attorney General Eric Holder, Secretary Kathleen Sebel April 2012 Summit on Preventing Youth Violence

Representatives from Boston, Chicago, Detroit, Memphis, Salinas, and San Jose gathered in Washington, DC on April 2 and 3, 2012 for the second Summit on Preventing Youth Violence.

Teens Holding Hands Justice Department Research Shows That School-Level Interventions Reduce Dating Violence by up to 50 Percent

The Department of Justice today announced new research from the National Institute of Justice (NIJ) that finds school-level interventions reduced dating violence among middle school students by up to 50 percent in 30 New York City public schools.

Gang Prevention Gang Prevention: An Overview of Research and Programs

The recent Juvenile Justice bulletin, published by the U.S. Dept. of Justice, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Programs (OJJDP), presents a compilation of current research on gangs, including data on the state of gang problems in the United States today, why youth join gangs...

The Honorable Eric Holder, Jr., Attorney General of the United States, U.S. Depa National Forum on Youth Violence Prevention Working Session 2011

Representatives from Boston, Chicago, Detroit, Memphis, Salinas, and San Jose gathered in Washington, DC on October 31 and November 1, 2011 for the National Forum on Youth Violence Prevention Working Session.

Teens smiling Cities Working Together to Reduce Youth Violence

The National Forum on Youth Violence Prevention (the Forum) is an interagency effort for localities to share knowledge and experience in what works and what doesn't work in preventing youth and gang related violence.

CDC logo CDC Awards $4.5M to Prevent Youth Violence in Four STRYVE Communities

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announced today an award totaling $4.5 million to be divided among four public health departments that were selected to participate in a youth violence prevention demonstration project over a period of five years.

The Honorable Eric Holder, Jr., Attorney General of the United States, U.S. Depa Six Cities Present Plans to Reduce and Prevent Youth Violence

Officials from Boston; Chicago; Detroit; Memphis, Tenn.; Salinas, Calif.; and San Jose, Calif., have spent the past several months preparing plans detailing how they can work within their communities to address youth violence.

Creating Violence-Free, Healthy, and Prospering Communities Requires Your Voice Creating Violence-Free, Healthy, and Prospering Communities Requires Your Voice

Youth violence destroys quality of life and decreases the freedom, health, and prosperity of individuals, families, and communities. Unaddressed youth violence and crime negatively affect our communities' physical, mental, and economic health and challenges our ability to educate, grow, and prosper.

Teens discussing CDC's Division of Violence Prevention Offers Online Course on Principles of Prevention

Each year, more than 50,000 people lose their lives to violence. In addition to the tremendous physical and emotional toll, violence has substantial medical and lost productivity costs. In 2000, these totaled more than $70 billion in the United States.

Teens smiling Dating Matters: Understanding Teen Dating Violence Prevention

Early efforts to promote healthy, respectful dating relationships are more likely to prevent dating violence before the problem begins.

Safe Youth, Safe Schools Safe Youth, Safe Schools

More than 55 million young people will return to school in the United States this fall. While schools remain relatively safe, any amount of violence is unacceptable. Students, parents, teachers, and administrators expect schools to be safe havens of learning.